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Burning Lungs


Symptom: Burning lungs during and after exersize. No wheezing or restriction of air tube feeling, just lung burn. What is it? Many asthmatics have a wheezing restrictive airway path. Not many seem to report purely burning in the lungs.

Personal findings, a rant of mine about silly doctors

My doctor said that I probably had asthma if I felt burning, so she prescribed an asthma med to me for free right on the spot. Being the stubborn scientific person I am, I asked questions as to why she knew I had asthma for sure? And what was asthma? And what kind of asthma did I have?

She couldn't really answer and just recommended I try the asthma drug to see if it helped, and if it did, then that was the answer to my problems. That's like giving someone heroin and asking them if it makes them feel better. Obviously it will, but what side effects and at what cost? Did I say that I was having difficulty climbing stairs? No, all I said was that I was having a burning sensation while doing exercize - a really annoying burning sensation that made me feel like I was having a bit of blood in my lungs even at low pace.

I took the medicine box of asthma home and threw it in the garbage. Why should I take asthma meds without being scientifically analyzed? What was this "asthma" I had anyway? Aren't there different types of asthma, and not just one drug that will magically solve my problems instantly?

I had read that asthma was when one had "attacks" and when one "could not breath due to restrictions" in the airway paths. I was not feeling like there was an "attack" or a "restriction", rather I was simply feeling burning which was not bad enough to cause me to go into any attack or panic. It was just annoying pain, rather. So why should i take a drug if I wasn't in danger - I was just being annoyed by some pain? I wanted answers, but couldn't find any.

The prescription was given to me based on presumption without any actual testing. So after I threw out the medicine in the garbage I waited for a few years doing not much exercize.. and the problem went away. My lungs still burn in cold weather if I have not done much exersize. It helps to do light exercise for 4 hours in cold weather for several weeks, and then go back to doing regular paced exercise after that. My suspicion is that my lungs are especially sensitive when they cannot intake enough oxygen, so they start to signal pain to slow my system and me down. My lungs seem to be inflamed and painful when I push myself hard in cold weather - but I don't feel any "restriction" nor do I have any wheezing. It is purely a cold or dryness feeling right in my lung blood almost.

Although asthma supposedly involves heavy "restrictions" and "inflaming", I cannot find any true definition of what the phrase "asthma" really means. I think "Asthma" is an easy way for doctors to prescribe drugs whenever someone has any sort of "lung problem" whatsoever, even if each and every person's lung problems are very different - it is all coined as "asthma".

I have found my burning to lessen by waiting a few years, and training more in colder weather at light consistent paces. Fast bursts, such as skating hard and then stopping will cause more burning than lightly running or lightly skating for 3 hours. Sometimes drinking water while the burning is happening can help - maybe the lungs are becoming dehydrated or maybe the water psychologically helps a bit. Drinking water won't magically solve the problem, I just found it helped a bit - along with training longer at lighter paces. After training longer at lighter paces, try pushing it hard and seeing if the burn goes away. For example, instead of going for a half hour hard skate or hard bike ride, I went for long easy 3-4 hours skates in the cold. There was a bit of burning, but not as much as when I was doing hard exersize. After a few years, I found that I could exercise hard without the burning.

Anyway, in the summer time after I had given up on finding out what true "asthma" meant, and after I had been going out for long skates in the cold, I ran a 21 minute 5 km run after training for a few weeks. I'm sure I could run an 17-18 minute 5km if I trained more. Is this asthma I have then, if I can run a 5km fairly fast? I would guess most people with real "asthma" problems could barely run a 5KM in 30 minutes, if even that! So why did my doctor prescribe me with asthma meds, without first testing whether I really had "asthma"? All I did was come in and complain and tell the doctor I was experiencing burning in my lungs - I didn't get tested for asthma - and yet I was prescribed asthma meds?

Can I get cocaine and steroids this easily from the doctor too? Actually, as far as I know, the asthma meds do contain steroids. Joy!

During my worst years when I had lung burn, I was also low on iron. I was experiencing nose bleeds due to enlarged vessels in my nose. My lung burn seemed to be lessened when my iron/hemoglobin was at a normal state when I stopped having nosebleeds. I was also going through growing and was in my teens when I had the worst lung burn.

I am guessing that the lung burn disappeared mostly because:

  • iron was up and stayed up consistently after I solved nose bleed issue
  • growing stage of life was mostly finished
  • I started training at light paces instead of medium or hard paces that I like, and I only pushed it hard after training for weeks of longer and slower paces
  • I started training more in cold weather at light paces to tune my lungs and get them used to burning, then when I did exersize in warmer weather it was like cutting cake
  • I picked places with less cars, pollution seemed to bother my lungs, especially diesel trucks, buses, and any car that was old
  • combination of all of the above

Other information found on the internet with people that have similar problems:
Quote:
" Burning Lungs 
I seem to have a problem with my lungs burning. Taking a deep breath in and out 
hurts. I have had asthma for most of my life and I have been hoping that cycling will
improve my lungs. I'm on a preventer + long acting bronchodilator and I always take 
Ventolin and Intal Forte before ride, but the lung burning still happens. What is it?
? How can I stop it from happening? I bought a face mask for winter to help warm the 
air that I breathe and I hope it will work because this is getting a bit frustrating  

Thanks Sam
   
 	
 29-04.-2005, 06:53 AM 	  #2 	
andrello 
Registered User
 

Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 58 
 Re: Burning Lungs 
You should talk to a physician. If he/she tells you not to do the exercise then find 
another. But you should see a doctor. Be careful!
   
 	
 29-04.-2005, 11:17 AM 	  #3 	
rockmuncher 
Banned
 
 
 

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Gosford NSW OZ
Posts: 56 
 Re: Burning Lungs 
Quote:
Originally Posted by samcrx3
I seem to have a problem with my lungs burning. Taking a deep breath in and out 
hurts. I have had asthma for most of my life and I have been hoping that cycling will 
improve my lungs. I'm on a preventer + long acting bronchodilator and I always take 
Ventolin and Intal Forte before ride, but the lung burning still happens. What is it?
? How can I stop it from happening? I bought a face mask for winter to help warm the 
air that I breathe and I hope it will work because this is getting a bit frustrating  

Thanks Sam
I started getting a bad burning sensation at the top of my lungs in mid February this 
year. It turned out to be an upper respiratory tract infection which I'm still 
battling. I've been off the bike (again!) for the past week and I still can't shake 
it completely.


For you it could be related to:
your asthma, 
your medication, 
the way your are taking your medication (eg. taking reliever before your ride),
airborne pollution (eg. dust, pollen),
humidity (dry, cold air affects mouth-breathers badly),
or you might just be getting the dreaded lurgey.

Go with andrello's advice: see your doctor
   
 	
 29-04.-2005, 02:04 PM 	  #4 	
willtsmith 
Registered User
 

Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 52 
 Overdialated ??? 
Quote:
Originally Posted by samcrx3
I seem to have a problem with my lungs burning. Taking a deep breath in and out 
hurts. I have had asthma for most of my life and I have been hoping that cycling will 
improve my lungs. I'm on a preventer + long acting bronchodilator and I always take 
Ventolin and Intal Forte before ride, but the lung burning still happens. What is it?
? How can I stop it from happening? I bought a face mask for winter to help warm the 
air that I breathe and I hope it will work because this is getting a bit frustrating  
Thanks Sam

I have cold weather/exertional asthma. Though, I only have it when I'm out of shape.

Anyway, I kinda get the same sensation sometimes after taking a big puff. It's 
accompanied by a little light headedness. Personally, I think it's from 
overdialation.

I dunno. It goes away after a while. I just remember that the better shape I'm in, 
the less asthma I have.
   
 	
 29-04.-2005, 02:45 PM 	  #5 	
samcrx3 
Registered User
 

Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Bathurst NSW Australia
Posts: 13 
 Re: Burning Lungs 
I think it might be where we live - cold dry air. Perhaps controlling my breathing 
during a ride might help. My GP knows about it - he's hoping as I get fitter, it will 
get better. One can only hope.
Sam
   
 	
  	  	

 
 29-04.-2005, 04:44 PM 	  #6 	
octagon 
Registered User
 

Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: london, england
Posts: 18 
 Re: Burning Lungs 
Just to note that you probably shouldn't use your short acting bronchodilator 
(ventolin) prophylactically. there has been some research to suggest this might 
actually worsen lung function, in the long run. Your doctor can advise you about 
alternative long-acting bronchodilators, like salmeterol, which may be more 
appropriate to use in this way.
   
 	
 29-04.-2005, 04:54 PM 	  #7 	
samcrx3 
Registered User
 

Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Bathurst NSW Australia
Posts: 13 
 Re: Burning Lungs 
Quote:
Originally Posted by octagon
Just to note that you probably shouldn't use your short acting bronchodilator 
(ventolin) prophylactically. there has been some research to suggest this might 
actually worsen lung function, in the long run. Your doctor can advise you about 
alternative long-acting bronchodilators, like salmeterol, which may be more 
appropriate to use in this way.


I only use Ventolin before a ride otherwise I don't usually use it unless I need it. 
I regularly use a combination inhaled steroid/long acting bronchodilator - Seretide. 
Are you suggesting that it may be better that I don't take Ventolin before a ride 
because it may make things worse in the long run? Might be worth a try and just use 
the Intal Forte before the ride. Thanks, Sam.

   
 	
 29-04.-2005, 10:41 PM 	  #8 	
HughMann 
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Townsville Qld Australia
Posts: 105 
 Re: Burning Lungs 
Quote:
Originally Posted by samcrx3
I seem to have a problem with my lungs burning. Taking a deep breath in and out 
hurts. I have had asthma for most of my life and I have been hoping that cycling will 
improve my lungs. I'm on a preventer + long acting bronchodilator and I always take 
Ventolin and Intal Forte before ride, but the lung burning still happens. What is it?
? How can I stop it from happening? I bought a face mask for winter to help warm the 
air that I breathe and I hope it will work because this is getting a bit frustrating  
Thanks Sam



Speak to the Nurse at your medical practice. Ask about an asthma management plan 
review. Will possibly need to book a long appointment to go right through everything. 
This is what all those purple dragon thingies are about in Drs rooms and chemists.
Have you ever read the little piece of paper that comes with the medications. Bet you 
havent - 95% havent and there is lots of important info there.

Do you use an adult spacer for your ventolin or just spray paint the inside of your 
mouth with medication and swallow 80% of the dose! No good to the lungs if its in 
your stomach. 
Do you use a peak flow meter and chart the results. They are about $20 and can be 
used to predict problems often.
Have you had your nasal passages checked over. If there is a problem there get it 
fixed - its worth it. Should breathe in through nose especially in cold as it takes 
the chill of the air. Shove a couple of folded pages of newspaper down the front of 
your jumper, wrap a scarf around your face or get a balaclava from Disposals Shop

lived and worked outside in Canberra for 15 years and the only time I suffered what 
you describe was when I had a chest infection. 


Hope you find an answer soon. Dont blame you for being frustrated.

Cheers
Hugh
   
 	
 02-05.-2005, 10:46 AM 	  #9 	
samcrx3 
Registered User
 

Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Bathurst NSW Australia
Posts: 13 
 Re: Burning Lungs 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HughMann
Speak to the Nurse at your medical practice. Ask about an asthma management plan 
review. Will possibly need to book a long appointment to go right through everything. 
This is what all those purple dragon thingies are about in Drs rooms and chemists.
Have you ever read the little piece of paper that comes with the medications. Bet you 
havent - 95% havent and there is lots of important info there.

Do you use an adult spacer for your ventolin or just spray paint the inside of your 
mouth with medication and swallow 80% of the dose! No good to the lungs if its in 
your stomach. 
Do you use a peak flow meter and chart the results. They are about $20 and can be 
used to predict problems often.
Have you had your nasal passages checked over. If there is a problem there get it 
fixed - its worth it. Should breathe in through nose especially in cold as it takes 
the chill of the air. Shove a couple of folded pages of newspaper down the front of 
your jumper, wrap a scarf around your face or get a balaclava from Disposals Shop


lived and worked outside in Canberra for 15 years and the only time I suffered what 
you describe was when I had a chest infection. 


Hope you find an answer soon. Dont blame you for being frustrated.

Cheers
Hugh


Thanks for your help here. I'm pretty sure I'm doing all the right things. I use a 
breath a tech spacer and have a plan etc. I even see a repiratory physician. Perhaps 
controlled breathing during the ride may help?? I bought a windproof face mask for 
when it gets really cold.
Regards, Sam
   
 	
 02-05.-2005, 01:17 PM 	  #10 	
willtsmith 
Registered User
 

Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 52 
 A warmup for the cold ... 
Quote:
Originally Posted by samcrx3
Thanks for your help here. I'm pretty sure I'm doing all the right things. I use a 
breath a tech spacer and have a plan etc. I even see a repiratory physician. Perhaps 
controlled breathing during the ride may help?? I bought a windproof face mask for 
when it gets really cold.
Regards, Sam

A "coldup" may be what your lungs need. A VERY low intensity workout to acclimate to 
cold conditions. THEN, ramp up the workout.
   
 	
 02-05.-2005, 03:02 PM 	  #11 	
colt59 
Registered User
 

Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 1 
 Re: Burning Lungs 
I had that same sensation a couple of years ago, and I, too suffer from asthma. 
Turned out, however, that the burning lungs were a symptom of a coronary artery 
blockage. Make sure your doctor checks this possibility.
Take care, and good luck.
   
 	
 03-05.-2005, 09:52 PM 	  #12 	
HughMann 
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Townsville Qld Australia
Posts: 105 
 Re: Burning Lungs 
Quote:
Originally Posted by samcrx3
Thanks for your help here. I'm pretty sure I'm doing all the right things. I use a 
breath a tech spacer and have a plan etc. I even see a repiratory physician. Perhaps 
controlled breathing during the ride may help?? I bought a windproof face mask for 
when it gets really cold.
Regards, Sam


If you are unsure of anything go back for a review. Didnt you get a written Plan, its 
usual.

AFIK Breath A Tech spacers are all small. Good for children but the "adult" size is 
not very big.
The A&H spacer has a volume of about 1 litre and is much more effective. Its made of 
2 conical pieces that pull apart for easy cleaning. The Breath A Tech is fine for 
travelling but for home use the larger size is more effective.

Of course the obvious fix is dont ride so hard. Take it easy and stay in the comfort 
zone during the cold weather. Have you investigated - link - Buteyko Method. Might be 
something interesting there.

Dont know about controlled breathing. Doesnt work for me for hill climbing.

Cheers
Hugh
   
 	
 04-05.-2005, 09:44 AM 	  #13 	
samcrx3 
Registered User
 

Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Bathurst NSW Australia
Posts: 13 
 Re: Burning Lungs 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HughMann
AFIK Breath A Tech spacers are all small. Good for children but the "adult" size is 
not very big.
The A&H spacer has a volume of about 1 litre and is much more effective. Its made of 
2 conical pieces that pull apart for easy cleaning. The Breath A Tech is fine for 
travelling but for home use the larger size is more effective.

Of course the obvious fix is dont ride so hard. Take it easy and stay in the comfort 
zone during the cold weather. Have you investigated - link - Buteyko Method. Might be 
something interesting there.

Cheers
Hugh


Is the larger one called a volumatic? It may be worth a try. My asthma has really 
become a problem since we came to Bathurst. I have even had a broncoscopy to find out 
what is going on in my lungs - they are just inflamed with plugs of thick mucus. 
Thinking I might try Lyprinol or other natural remedy on top of my usual medication.

I did a ride the other day and decided to start off slow to warm up and then pick up 
the pace. It seemed to help and managed to keep a good pace even though there was a 
fierce headwind, average speed 20.5km/hr. I may have to avoid the early morning rides 
I think, it can be up to -5 in the early mornings. The cycling club here does rides 
on Saturday afternoons in winter to avoid the cold mornings, so I seriously 
considering trying the racing club because of the better time. I love riding too much 
to give up, it gives me so much excitiment and pleasure. I feel on such a high after 
riding, it feels really invigorating.
Thanks Sam
   
 	
 04-05.-2005, 10:32 AM 	  #14 	
youm0nt 
Registered User
 

Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 65 
 Re: Burning Lungs 
i am wondering,it is normal for your lungs to "burn" during hard efforts?my lungs 
burn during hard stuff like intervals but i am fine after the workout.
   
 	
 06-05.-2005, 12:40 PM 	  #15 	
rockmuncher 
Banned
 
 
 

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Gosford NSW OZ
Posts: 56 
 Re: Burning Lungs 
Just a follow up on my original post


Quote:
Originally Posted by rockmuncher
I started getting a bad burning sensation at the top of my lungs in mid February this 
year. It turned out to be an upper respiratory tract infection which I'm still 
battling. I've been off the bike (again!) for the past week and I still can't shake 
it completely.

After a high dose course of erythromycin (antibiotics) the infection appears to have 
cleared up and I'm back to training. If I had of gone to the doctor sooner I wouldn't 
have spent so much time on and off the bike. Go see your doctor...

Quote: " 09-30-2003, 11:32 AM Katoom Guest Posts: n/a Exercise induced asthma and peak flow meter (kinda long) Howdy! Several weeks ago I was diagnosed with exercise induced asthma based on my description of symptoms during exercise of chest tightness and "burning lungs" that builds during the first 10-30 minutes of effort. (Is there a standard term for this "burnt" feeling in the lungs? It feels like what happens if you exercise very hard without warming up on a really cold day). However, I don't experience any "wheezing" except that when it gets really severe there is some shortness of breath. I was prescribed an albuterol inhaler, 2 puffs 30 minutes prior to exercise and 2-4 as needed with instructions to supply the physician feedback after a week or so. On my own I also got a peak flow meter (MiniWright) to monitor things. As it turns out, my doc is away for a few weeks and when he returns I'd like to be able to ask him some reasonably informed questions. I still get these symptoms during the early part of a workout even with the albuterol but perhaps not as bad as without (?). I expected that while I'm symptomatic during exercise that I would see decreases in my peak flow but this does not appear to be the case. In fact, my peak flow does not seem to vary all that much, most of the time within about 5% of what I would call the median, and very seldom much less. Using albuterol does raise the peak flow somewhat but not by much more than several percent. Severity of symptoms seems unrelated to peak flow readings. Have I misunderstood the purpose of the PFM and it's monitoring function? If the symptoms of EIA are not always related to flow problems how else do you determine if you are medicating it properly? Also, is it common for the symptoms above to be greatly diminished after the first hard efforts? I.e. after the first half hour which includes some intervals of moderate effort with (kind of scary) symptoms the rest of the ride or run is good and can contain periods of significant effort with only a hint of symptoms. Is that the albuterol at work or is that just the way that EIA can be? Thanks for any background or references that you can offer! Katoom P.S. As I stated above I ask these questions so that I can educate myself and work with my doctor more effectively. Commercial Break #2 09-30-2003, 02:28 PM Saffy Guest Posts: n/a Re: Exercise induced asthma and peak flow meter (kinda long) "Katoom" wrote in message newsan.2003.09.30.16.32.18.72878@pacbell.net... > I expected that while I'm symptomatic > during exercise that I would see decreases in my peak flow > but this does not appear to be the case. In fact, my > peak flow does not seem to vary all that much, most of > the time within about 5% of what I would call the median, > and very seldom much less. My peak flow never varies much - in fact it is very good for my size etc I thought that you had to have a reduced peak flow to be asthmatic but apparantly that is not the case. Saffy. #3 09-30-2003, 07:32 PM Michael Halliwell Guest Posts: n/a Re: Exercise induced asthma and peak flow meter (kinda long) "Katoom" wrote in message newsan.2003.09.30.16.32.18.72878@pacbell.net... > Howdy! > > Several weeks ago I was diagnosed with exercise induced > asthma based on my description of symptoms during exercise > of chest tightness and "burning lungs" that builds during > the first 10-30 minutes of effort. (Is there a standard > term for this "burnt" feeling in the lungs? It feels like > what happens if you exercise very hard without warming > up on a really cold day). However, I don't experience any > "wheezing" except that when it gets really severe there > is some shortness of breath. > > I was prescribed an albuterol inhaler, 2 puffs 30 minutes > prior to exercise and 2-4 as needed with instructions to > supply the physician feedback after a week or so. On my own > I also got a peak flow meter (MiniWright) to monitor things. > As it turns out, my doc is away for a few weeks and when he > returns I'd like to be able to ask him some reasonably > informed questions. > > I still get these symptoms during the early part of a > workout even with the albuterol but perhaps not as > bad as without (?). I expected that while I'm symptomatic > during exercise that I would see decreases in my peak flow > but this does not appear to be the case. In fact, my > peak flow does not seem to vary all that much, most of > the time within about 5% of what I would call the median, > and very seldom much less. Using albuterol does raise > the peak flow somewhat but not by much more than several > percent. Severity of symptoms seems unrelated to peak flow > readings. Hi There, In my case the peak flow dropped significantly with effort to start with (more than 15%), but my average day-to-day didn't vary by much. In my case, I don't wheeze much either...I go straight to a tight chest. If you are new to an MDI (puffer) it can take a while to master...even the new HFA propellant ones. Make sure your technique is up to par before you conculde that the inhaler doesn't work for you. If the inhaler work is ok, then I think you should talk to your physician again. > Also, is it common for the symptoms above to be greatly > diminished after the first hard efforts? I.e. after the > first half hour which includes some intervals of moderate > effort with (kind of scary) symptoms the rest of the ride > or run is good and can contain periods of significant > effort with only a hint of symptoms. Is that the albuterol > at work or is that just the way that EIA can be? > In my case, once I got to the "bad" stage, I got used to it...I went 20+ years before getting my first puffer and was under the impression that I didn't have asthma because that's what the kids with puffers had and I didn't have a puffer. After the first 1/2 mile (800m) I was in the "bad" stage and just kept on huffing and puffing along...It can be a matter of perception or your body adjusting to the difference as it has before you started with the inhaler. My advice would be to check your inhaler technique, check you PF technique (it will vary with your effort) and see if there are any changes with exercise. If you've done so-so without it (and I know some of the doctors on this group will flame me for this suggestion), you may wish to get a reference to the "bad" symptoms by starting without the puffer, getting a peak flow, and seeing what happens when you take the inhaler at that point (like an exercise challenge that is sometimes done as part of spirometery). Hope it helps, Michael H. -- *************************************** Michael Halliwell temple2some@shaw.nospam.ca To Reply: remove the "nospam" *************************************** #4 10-01-2003, 09:57 AM Katoom Guest Posts: n/a Re: Exercise induced asthma and peak flow meter (kinda long) Howdy! "Saffy" wrote: >I thought that you had to have a reduced peak flow to be > asthmatic but apparantly that is not the case. Ah! That's interesting to hear! Thanks, Katoom #5 10-01-2003, 10:09 AM Katoom Guest Posts: n/a Re: Exercise induced asthma and peak flow meter (kinda long) Howdy! "Michael Halliwell" wrote: > If you are new to an MDI (puffer) it can take a while > to master That's the truth! At first I could feel the puffs hitting lips, etc.. and taste the stuff even with a spacer. Now, most of the time I don't taste it or anything, it just feels like a hint of coolness sucked in. > If the inhaler work is ok, then I > think you should talk to your physician again. That's the plan in any case. I guess I'm confused about whether or not I should feel "normal" (i.e. no significant chest tightness,etc..) with the albuterol or if I just need to "deal" with feeling this uncomfortable at the start of exercise. It's a new experience that has seemingly came out of nowhere. > reference to the "bad" symptoms by starting without the > puffer, getting a peak flow, and seeing what happens when > you take the inhaler at that point The value (and advisability) of such an experiment is one of the questions that I had for the doc. > Hope it helps, It does indeed, thanks! Katoom #6 10-02-2003, 03:32 AM Richard Friedel Guest Posts: n/a Re: Exercise induced asthma and peak flow meter (kinda long) Katoom wrote: > > Howdy! > > Several weeks ago I was diagnosed with exercise induced > asthma based on my description of symptoms during exercise > of chest tightness and "burning lungs" that builds during > the first 10-30 minutes of effort. (Is there a standard > term for this "burnt" feeling in the lungs? It feels like > what happens if you exercise very hard without warming > up on a really cold day). However, I don't experience any > "wheezing" except that when it gets really severe there > is some shortness of breath. > > I was prescribed an albuterol inhaler, 2 puffs 30 minutes > prior to exercise and 2-4 as needed with instructions to > supply the physician feedback after a week or so. On my own > I also got a peak flow meter (MiniWright) to monitor things. > As it turns out, my doc is away for a few weeks and when he > returns I'd like to be able to ask him some reasonably > informed questions. > > I still get these symptoms during the early part of a > workout even with the albuterol but perhaps not as > bad as without (?). I expected that while I'm symptomatic > during exercise that I would see decreases in my peak flow > but this does not appear to be the case. In fact, my > peak flow does not seem to vary all that much, most of > the time within about 5% of what I would call the median, > and very seldom much less. Using albuterol does raise > the peak flow somewhat but not by much more than several > percent. Severity of symptoms seems unrelated to peak flow > readings. > > Have I misunderstood the purpose of the PFM and it's > monitoring function? If the symptoms of EIA are not > always related to flow problems how else do you determine > if you are medicating it properly? > > Also, is it common for the symptoms above to be greatly > diminished after the first hard efforts? I.e. after the > first half hour which includes some intervals of moderate > effort with (kind of scary) symptoms the rest of the ride > or run is good and can contain periods of significant > effort with only a hint of symptoms. Is that the albuterol > at work or is that just the way that EIA can be? > > Thanks for any background or references that you can > offer! > > Katoom > > P.S. As I stated above I ask these questions so that I > can educate myself and work with my doctor more > effectively. Well, with my bronchitis tending to cause a breathing difficulties on exertion but not so much an actual spasm of the airways, maintenance of breathing from the diaphragm seems to be a remedy. It also stops wheeze, but has to be done properly. Choose some exercise which is as steady and monotonous as possible, that is to say not rope jumping or aerobics but walking up a hill or treadmill exercise. Then make authentic diaphragmatic breathing the top priority. If you breathe thru the nose, try pressing the tip of the tongue against the palate or front teeth on an inhale. If you breathe thru the mouth, see that each inhale is really wired to (not just synchronized with) a feeling of contraction of the diaphragm. If you've learned "deep breathing" by lying on your back and placing one hand on the chest and the other on the abdomen, then it might be best to forget about it. It is only belly puffing, which can be done without breathing at all! If the tongue on the palate stuff does not seem to help, there is the technique using an incentive spiromter ((f. i. Voldyne) as taught to post-operative patients who may tend to breathe shallowly owing to operation incisions. As can be seen from descriptions of asthma, proper diaphragm action is emphasized, so the system is at least logical. Recent research is centered on the fact that a healthy person quickly overcomes an airway spasm caused by a provocation test (asthma diagnosis), but cannot overcome it if prevented from taking a deep breath. An asthmatic cannot overcome the spasm by normal breathing maneuvers, but this would seem to be a pointer toward using breathing techniques rather than using asthma drugs. The problem would of course remain that many will want to play games with others and not stick to monotonous workouts. Regards, Richard Friedel. #7 10-02-2003, 10:00 AM None Required Guest Posts: n/a Re: Exercise induced asthma and peak flow meter (kinda long) Peak flow is pretty good at detecting narrowing of the larger airway but doesn't work well for the smaller airways. You need a much more sensitive device for that (spirometry) and it may not be worth the expense and hassle. Thus you may not show much difference with Albuterol. "Generally" a 15% change is noteworthy but not always the case. More indicative is wether it makes exercise go better. Your feedback makes it sound like it isn't helping much. Make sure you are reasonably hydrated before exercise. Dehydration will make it worse. If there is an asthma/allergy component then something in the environment where you are exercising may be compromising the issue. Possibly change location or exercise to check it out. Warm up very slowly. Give the body a chance to get accustomed to the load. If you are expanding your "boundries" and pushing aerobic fitness you may just be hitting your own personal wall. Anyone will get that lung burning feeling if pushed harder than they are used to. Increases should not be more than 10% of current load per week Lastly, it could be a cardiac issue. You need to take a look at your age, family history, weight, nutrutional status, all that heart disease stuff and possibly run this by the physician as at least a remote possibility. If the heart can't pump it the feeling will be the same in the lungs. -- F. Merkel Respiratory Care Practitioner Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America-WA Branch"
"Erik Eckel Apr 14 1998, 12:00 am show options I'm a cyclist that's been on Ventolin/Proventil for four years. A year ago I began taking Vanceril (2x twice a day). Three weeks ago I was switched to Serevent and Flovent 2x twice a day. Now, whenever I start a workout at high energy, I experience a painful burning in my lungs. It feels almost as if I swallowed a grapefruit whole or something, and this feeling takes awhile to dissipate, and it only does so once my heart rate lowers considerably. I never used to experience this, except on very cold days (ambient air temperature <45 degrees F.) Now, it occurs at ambient air temperatures of 70 degrees F. Is this my meds? I'm also now taking some pill for post nasal drip and Nasonex, which I never took before."
"Jeremy Broughton Apr 4 1997, 1:00 am show options I recently began running after a 4 year lapse. I ran cross-country in high school for 3 years and was quite good, (that was 3 years ago), I have neglected my health for the past 3 years in order to concentrate on school, but now that I have graduated, and gained 25 pounds in the process, I have enough free time to begin training again......ANYWAYS, my problem is that I have been running in cold weather (-3 to -10 celcius), and my lungs have begin to hurt very badly about 1/2 way through my run, and persists for about an hour after I have stopped, I have difficulty taking full breaths due to the pain. Is this due to the cold weather...or some other factor you might suggest?? I have absolutely NO history of asthma. any help is greatly appreciated. Jeremy Broughton" ...No replies
Posted by Carol on August 21, 1998 at 17:43:58: Does anyone else have these symptoms? I have the sensation that I am exhaling very hot air. My lungs and throat feel like I have been inhaling Hot , dry air--like sucking on a hair dryer hose. I was told I have asthma recently, but I have no trouble breathing and am on Accolate. This symptom comes and goes. Sound familiar to anyone? HELP. Thanks, Carol Please e-mail me if you know what this is. (I'm not sure how I got to this web site)." ...No replies

Some replies to the above posts were "you could be out of shape". Although we respect this possibility, in many cases this is definitely not the issue. Some of us are athletes and know exactly what it feels like to be "out of shape".

I've even completed triathlons without training, and know very well the feeling of being out of shape. Having lung burn after running to the local mailbox at the end of the street and getting severe pain in the lungs is not just a case of being "out of shape".


Links: Cycling Forum Post, Google Group Search
Subject: lung burn, lung burning, burning lung, burning feeling in lungs, lung pain, blood taste, burning lungs afer exersize, burn feeling during exersize.

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